Escaped boa constrictor on the move

OH, the stories he could tell.

A boa constrictor on the loose in suburbs around Minmi has proved to be a bit of a traveller.

Have you seen the snake? Phone Hunter Wildlife Rescue Service on 0418 628 483 and let us know, email news@theherald.com.au

The Newcastle Herald has been contacted by readers who have spotted the illegal exotic trying to hitch a ride along main roads in the area.

The Herald reported yesterday the potentially deadly reptile had been on the loose in western Newcastle for at least a fortnight.

Hunter Wildlife Rescue Service president Audrey Koosmen said they did not know how the snake came to be in the area but suspected it was dumped or escaped from an illegal breeder.

They were sent a picture of it by a member of the public who saw it on Minmi Road at Fletcher two weeks ago.

Verna Dabrowa, of Black Hill, said she saw it on Black Hill Road about 100metres east of Black Hill Public School three weeks ago.

She, along with others, pulled over to inspect the thick snake, which was curled up in the middle of the road sunning itself.

‘‘It was massive, as big as my arm,’’ she said.

‘‘It was really brown with these black bits on it.’’

Ms Dabrowa said she regularly had red-bellied black and brown snakes on her property.

‘‘I have never seen a snake like it,’’ she said.

To get to Minmi the snake would have had to somehow cross the F3 freeway.

‘‘As long as it’s not headed towards my house I’ll be happy,’’ Ms Dabrowa said.

Another Fletcher resident said she saw it near the intersection of Kurraka Crescent and Minmi Road on Mother’s Day with a large lump in its middle.

Boa constrictors have not been linked with any human deaths but experts generally suggest they be kept away from small children because of the way they squeeze small prey to death.

Other types of constrictors such as Burmese and reticulated pythons have been linked with human deaths overseas.

While the one on the loose may not have a mate, scientists proved in 2010 that like some reptiles the female boas can reproduce on their own.

Ms Koosmen warned people to keep clear if they saw the snake and to contact animal rescuers.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop