Angled parking plan runs into opposition

PLANS to introduce angled parking on Hunter Street are "superficial", would hinder buses and create traffic problems in other parts of the city, according to submissions opposing the proposal.

Hunter Commuter Council secretary Graham Boyd chaired Newcastle City Council's traffic committee during the last term and said it had rejected a similar proposal because of its impacts.

Dr Boyd said the idea, which has been placed on public exhibition, was contrary to the council's Hunter Street revitalisation plans.

"We are going to need an extra 200 bus movements a day to carry passengers [once the rail line to Newcastle is removed] and you're going to cut out what was going to be a dedicated bus lane," Dr Boyd said.

The previous proposal was rejected because of the potential to choke inner suburbs as motorists sought alternate routes out of the city, along Watt Street and Darby Street, he said.

"So both cars and buses will be impacted for the sake of a few more parking spaces," Dr Boyd said.

The plans were hailed in a press release last month as part of the council's "strategic direction to create a connected city".

About 20 extra parking spaces would be created between Darby and Brown streets by reducing traffic from four lanes to two.

A council spokeswoman said last week they were developed after councillors directed staff to investigate opportunities for angled parking in the central business district and that the city welcomed public feedback.

The Newcastle Herald understands Hunter Valley Buses has lodged a submission in opposition and that Transport for NSW has also raised concerns.

Public transport advocate Darrell Harris complained about the council's "feeble" attempt to justify the plan.

"What is available is superficial, failing to provide justification for the proposal or relevance to a broad range of policy areas," Mr Harris wrote.

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