OBITUARY: Lola Rose, artist 

Born May 7, 1924

Died June 13, 2013

LOLA Rose was only 14 when she began exhibiting her art work.

By 21 she had received widespread recognition for her landscape, still life and portraits and had won countless awards.

Her paintings were exhibited at Buckingham Palace and Government House, among other distinguished locations. She was a good friend of the 13th Governor-General of Australia, Lord William Slim, and his wife and was a contemporary of such famous Australian artists as Margaret Olley, William Dobell and Nora Heysen.

Mrs Rose and a group of fellow artists, including Reg Russom, George Daniel and Tom Ninness, were active in the development of the Newcastle Art Gallery and she was a life member of the Newcastle Art Society, an organisation she joined nearly 70 years ago.

Throughout her final illness, Mrs Rose continued to prepare works for exhibition, such was her love and enthusiasm for painting and drawing.

Sadly, Mrs Rose died on June 13 this year.

She was 89.

Mrs Rose was born on May 7, 1924, in Adamstown, and her ability as an artist was evident at a young age.

She was greatly influenced by her grandmother Alice Reynolds and her mother and father, and received training from Mr Daniel, Mr Russom and Mr Ninness.

She painted in oils, pastels, gouache and watercolour; drew in lamp black, pencil and squid ink; and made tapestries, one of which Lady Slim asked her to prepare for the Queen.

"To Newcastle art lovers, Lola Rose was a treasured artist and friend," Newcastle Art Society's Robert Loughran said.

"Over her long career as a painter of landscapes, still life, portraits of people and animals she was a much sought-after artist.

"Friends and acquaintances would especially come to Newcastle Art Society's exhibitions hoping to meet her and purchase her work.

"Lola painted and sketched with well-known Australian artists Margaret Olley, Rufus Morris, William Dobell, George Daniel, Doug Sealy, Nora Heysen, Joshua Smith and Bill Freeman.

"She joined Newcastle Art Society nearly 70 years ago and was an active member until she took leave to help set up family farms.

"She rejoined NAS in 1972 and was made a life member in 1994.

"She continued to win awards right up to the last exhibition she entered in March 2013."

Considered a very private person, Mrs Rose lived in Broadmeadow and spent her time preparing works for exhibition, raising funds and prizes for raffles to support animal welfare organisations and providing help and support to many other artists.

"On one occasion, she calmly sketched a portrait of an intruder who was intent on robbing her," Mr Loughran said.

"The police were able to use the sketch to help arrest the criminal."

Friends and relatives attended a private funeral and Mrs Rose's ashes were scattered at her farm by her great-nephew Tony, other family members and a small group of friends.

To honour her memory, the Newcastle Art Society has created an art prize for paintings exhibited annually at the Jesmond shopping centre, starting next year.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop