Topics: Leia stood tall with her band of stormtroopers

STAR: A reluctant Kate Dundas-Sharrad, escorted by stormtroopers, turned heads at her St James Primary School year 6 farewell this month. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
STAR: A reluctant Kate Dundas-Sharrad, escorted by stormtroopers, turned heads at her St James Primary School year 6 farewell this month. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

KATE Dundas-Sharrad didn’t enjoy year 6; she’s soft-spoken, has a double-barrelled name and she’s nearly six foot. You get the picture.

She’d convinced her mum to let her skip the school camp, and now the year 6 farewell loomed. It was fancy dress. Mum had an idea.

‘‘I thought she’d make a good Princess Leia,’’ Kate’s mum, also Kate, tells Topics.

Kate senior happens to be mates with a group of men who dress up as Stormtroopers, the imperial footsoldiers from Star Wars.

(This is more common than you think. We know a bloke who’s with them.)

And so it was last Friday, at St James’ Primary School, Kotara South, that myriad Disney heroines, Spider-Men and SpongeBob SquarePantses looked up from their cups of Fanta to see Leia arrive with imperial entourage. Life-sized.

STAR: A reluctant Kate Dundas-Sharrad, escorted by stormtroopers, turned heads at her St James Primary School year 6 farewell this month. Picture: Matt Denholm

STAR: A reluctant Kate Dundas-Sharrad, escorted by stormtroopers, turned heads at her St James Primary School year 6 farewell this month. Picture: Matt Denholm

Kate, who hadn’t wanted to go, was the star of her farewell. She didn’t want to leave.

‘‘I was very nervous, then everyone wanted their photos with me,’’ she told Topics (after some prodding).

The Stormtroopers, all members of the local 501st Legion, put a photo of the night on their Facebook page, where it’s been liked by 12,000 people and shared 2500 times.

Impressed by Kate’s work as Leia, these (surely discerning) critics invited her to reprise the role this week at the Starlight children’s room at John Hunter Hospital. 

She agreed, joining a cast of characters on Thursday to visit sick kids, an experience she described to us as, ‘‘wow’’. Topics can back that up. We saw Big Dog get out of a lift, followed by Captain America.

Year 6 seems a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away.

Suddenly, the thought of high school isn’t so bad.

Kate, who is really tall when you meet her, is kind of looking forward to it.

‘‘I’m pretty excited,’’ she said.

‘‘It’ll be a chance to meet new people.’’

THE poet Bon Scott once mused: ‘‘It’s a long way to the top if you wanna rock’n’roll.’’ 

As ever, Bon was right.

Just ask (crackingly good) Sydney band the Preatures, who supported the Rolling Stones last month at Hope Estate.

This was the gig where Mick, Keef, Charlie and Ronnie’s backstage rider included airconditioned astroturf, making Spinal Tap seem quaintly down-to-earth.

Things were less ritzy for the Preatures, guitarist Jack Moffitt mentioned to the Herald’s Georgina Mitchell.

‘‘The green room [was] just a demountable, like an old history classroom with nothing in it,’’ Moffitt said.

‘‘Just a six-pack of beer and some water.

‘‘There wasn’t even any chairs in there, so we had to go and nick some plastic chairs and put them in the demountable.’’

Aircon astroturf it wasn’t. 

Mind you, the Preatures realise they’re not the Stones. 

Moffitt was stoked to be along for the ride.

‘‘[The Stones] do this, and they’ve been doing this, far longer than we can even comprehend as a band,’’ he said. 

‘‘I’m OK to take the hit of no chairs in the green room,’’ Moffitt said.