Newcastle company CWP Renewables will build a big wind farm in the New England Tablelands

Newcastle company CWP Renewables built the Boco Rock Wind Farm (pictured) in NSW. The company is planning to build another wind farm in the New England Tablelands.

Newcastle company CWP Renewables built the Boco Rock Wind Farm (pictured) in NSW. The company is planning to build another wind farm in the New England Tablelands.

A Newcastle-based company will build the largest wind farm in NSW on land between Glen Innes and Inverell in the New England Tablelands.

CWP Renewables will construct the 260-megawatt Sapphire Wind Farm, having won the ACT government’s latest wind-energy auction.

Power from the project will be sold to NSW customers, as well as those in the ACT.

CWP Renewables chief operating officer Ed Mounsey said construction was expected to begin later this year.

Mr Mounsey said the project would provide opportunity for the Port of Newcastle.

Wind-turbine component haulage was “a significant undertaking”, with unique challenges for stevedores.

“Use of the port has the potential to boost the local economy during the construction and haulage phase,” Mr Mounsey said.

Port of Newcastle chief executive Geoff Crowe said it was “great to support a new business contributing to the diversification of trade within our catchment area”.

Mr Crowe said it would “demonstrate the port’s capability in handling large and oversized cargoes”.

Newcastle lord mayor Nuatali Nelmes said the project was a “good example of the depth of talent in the Hunter's energy industry".

Cr Nelmes believed Newcastle and the Hunter should become "the energy hub of the country" and a leader in "clean technology and smart manufacturing".

Newcastle councillor Michael Osborne said it was “a great outcome for a Newcastle-based company”.

“This investment in the clean-energy economy is part of the much-needed transition away from the declining fossil-fuel economy,” Cr Osborne said.

Overall, the project would power about 110,000 homes, Mr Mounsey said.

The company would relocate its asset and operations team from other regional areas to the ACT, but its headquarters and development team would remain “firmly planted” in Newcastle.

ACT Minister for the Environment and Climate Change Simon Corbell said the project was a clean alternative to gas and coal-fired plants and would power new “high-growth industries”.

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