Bike Love Corral bike library gets people on a healthy and ethical mode of transport.

Daniel Endicott

Bike Love Corral

Pushing a message: Daniel Endicott of the University of Newcastle's Bike Love Corral wants more people on their bikes. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Pushing a message: Daniel Endicott of the University of Newcastle's Bike Love Corral wants more people on their bikes. Picture: Simone De Peak.

WHEN it comes to getting around town safely, quickly and ethically, Daniel Endicott wants to share the love.

He is one of the co-founders of the Bike Love Corral – a bike library at the University of Newcastle where staff, students and community members can buy, borrow or trade-in an affordable bike.

Housed at the rear of the Bike Hub East at the Callaghan campus, the Bike Love Corral library is operated by volunteer groups, including the University of Newcastle Bicycle User Group (NuBUG).

It was initially run out of Mr Endicott’s house while they waited for the building to become available at the university.

“The pushbike library offers ethical, safe bikes, and is all about promoting ethical transport that is faster and safer than you think,” Mr Endicott said.

“It can be much quicker and safer to ride through the back streets and take a few short cuts than it is to drive and then have to find a place to park.”

Mr Endicott said the Bike Love Corral also fixed a lot of bikes.

“It is another way of breaking the consumeristic mentality of buying new things that are delivered by trucks which is causing danger to society as well as the life cycle of the end product,” he said.

Mr Endicott had found many of the bikes on the side of the road that would have otherwise ended up as landfill.

“I’ll find a few every week that are getting thrown out,” he said.

“You can take them into some of the bike shops around town and they will quote you a ridiculous amount of money – $300 or $400 – to get them running again because they are in the market of selling a new bike. But with a lot of the old bikes, if you’ve got the right skills, with some adjusting you can get them working again.”

While many might see Mr Endicott’s efforts fixing up old bikes for others as a kind and helpful gesture, he said it also fulfilled a “selfish” desire to want a safer, more ethical community in which bikes form a part of the urban sprawl.

“Car culture is leading us down the wrong path,” he said. “Things about the obesity epidemic are in the news almost every day, so is climate change.

“Malcolm Turnbull wants 30-minute cities, urban sprawl doesn’t do that, it creates three hour-cities.”

Mr Endicott would like to see Newcastle, and Australia, have access to cycling infrastructure like European countries such as Holland and Denmark.

“It would create less congestion on the roads, and with better public transport, it would actually help everyone,” he said.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop