Newcastle Supercars noise can be stopped

Dog-eared: Domino the dog is a Supercars fan, but is a bit worried about the noise.

Dog-eared: Domino the dog is a Supercars fan, but is a bit worried about the noise.

By jove we’ve done it! We’ve solved one of the main criticisms of the Supercar race that’s coming to Newcastle.

Noise is surely the main concern. We started to think about this. We admit, this did hurt a bit. But no pain, no gain, right?

We strained our brain muscles and tried to think out of the box. Then it came to us. Earmuffs.

Newcastle City Council promised to consult the community over the Supercars. So we’d like to pass on this suggestion.

Every resident who complains about noise should be sent a top-notch pair of earmuffs.

We’d read that the council was spending about $2 million to bring the Supercars to Newcastle. So what’s a few bob more to keep the punters happy?

Now, we realise council budgets can be tight. So if earmuffs are considered too expensive, perhaps some earplugs will suffice.

Mini Memories

A 1970 cadet blue Mini owned by Hawks Nest's John Alterator.

A 1970 cadet blue Mini owned by Hawks Nest's John Alterator.

Topics wrote last Monday about memories related to a Herald story about a Mini Cooper winning Bathurst.

This prompted Hawks Nest’s John Alterator to share his Mini story.

“My pride and joy that I have owned for over 40 years is a 1970 Mk 2 Morris Cooper S,” John said.

“It has done over 500,000 miles. But today, it is seldom driven. It is cadet blue in colour with black trim and a 1275cc engine, converted to 5-speed. It still has its logbook identifying the original details.”

John recalled that police used Minis as pursuit cars in the late 60s and early 70s.

“As Peter Robinson mentioned [in the Herald story], they took out the first nine places outright in the 1966 Bathurst race. 

“There is a 1970 Mk 2 Cooper S on permanent display at the Goulburn Police Academy. These cars have become very collectable, fetching $70,000 in Australia recently and more than this in the UK.”

Falcon Nostalgia

Also last Monday, Topics noted that Ford Falcons will no longer be made in Australia.

A 1962 XL Falcon (right), which belonged to the father of Toronto's John Carr.

A 1962 XL Falcon (right), which belonged to the father of Toronto's John Carr.

The story about the last Falcon to roll off the assembly line at Ford’s factory in Broadmeadows in Victoria unleashed a wave of nostalgia around the country.

Toronto’s John Carr recalled his father’s first work-supplied vehicle was a 1962 XL Falcon.

“Dad was a short man and comments were made that the vehicle looked as though it was driving itself,” John said.

“His answer was to wear a hat – still a fashionable piece in the early 1960s.”

John sent us a picture of the Falcon, “outside our newly-constructed house on our gravel street”.

“It is parked beside a late 1950s MG Magnette ZA and a 1951 Riley RMC sports with a commonly found brick handbrake.” 

Lost Friend

Stephen Squires, of Okehampton in Devon in the UK, sent us a letter saying he was seeking a long lost friend.

“When based at RAAF Williamtown in the early 1960s, I met a nurse named Naomi Goodwin whose mother and brothers lived, I believe, at Cessnock.

“Naomi had a young daughter named Kim, I recall.

“I should have relocated to New Zealand, but for reasons beyond my control this never happened and I returned to the UK.

“I wonder if it would be possible for you to endeavour to locate Naomi for me, as I would very much like to know what became of her and Kim.

“They may well have married of course but I would, nevertheless, very much like to know what became of them.”

If you can help, let us know at topics@theherald.com.au.

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