Besieged ARL commission chairman John Grant says he will not stand down.

Besieged ARL commission chairman John Grant says he will not stand down despite facing a vote of no confidence from NRL clubs.

Grant also announced on Friday that Australia's Olympic boss John Coates would lead a review of the commission's consitution.

NRL clubs are angered the ARLC  had retracted an earlier in-principle agreement to provide 130 per cent of the salary cap in club funding from 2018.

But Grant says he has been given no reason to walk away.

"We clearly had a glitch on Wednesday but I expect to be able to take this forward," Grant told reporters on Friday.

"We clearly had a glitch on Wednesday.'' - JOHN GRANT

Grant said he expected to be in the role for at least another five years and had already begun organising another meeting with the club chairmen next week.

UNDER PRESSURE: ARL Commission chairman John Grant insists he is not going to resign despite a vote of no confidence.

UNDER PRESSURE: ARL Commission chairman John Grant insists he is not going to resign despite a vote of no confidence.

"I think the relationships I've got with the chairs, while they suffered on Wednesday have been very strong," he said.

The clubs have also called for constitutional change that would allow them to have two seats on the commission.

Grant appeared to offer an olive branch on that score.

He announced he had arranged for Australian Olympic Committee president and lawyer John Coates to lead a review into the current constitution, five seasons after the commission's creation.

"It is an appropriate time to do a constitutional review, and we need appropriate people to lead that and John Coates is second-to-none," Grant said.

Grant also confirmed the funding offer that was agreed to in December 2015 was now off the table.

"Things have changed," he said.

"The digital world has erupted with broadcast.

"We've got [player] participation issues that need to be addressed today.

"We've got different priorities that have come to pass."

He said the ARLC wanted to work with the clubs on a new funding model, and that he was confident clubs would understand.

Despite four club bosses storming out of a meeting on Wednesday and widespread speculation that Grant was on borrowed time in his position, the chairman remained positive of a palatable outcome for all parties, outlining the ARLC's goals for club meetings next week.

An official statement from the head office said that the Commission would endeavour to update clubs on key issues affecting the funding model (which include salary cap assumptions, the rationale for a football department cap, the status of CBA negotiations and the NRL's digital strategy), as well as attempting to progress talks on an appropriate funding model for clubs and the whole of game.

The 66-year-old Grant has occupied the role of ARLC boss since it was established in 2011. 

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