Out on parole for another assault and carrying six good behaviour bonds, Shane Gordon Adams stabbed a woman at a Maitland carpark

CCTV: Shane Gordon Adams (in the red hooded jumper) is caught on security footage at Maitland train station about 90 minutes before the attack.
CCTV: Shane Gordon Adams (in the red hooded jumper) is caught on security footage at Maitland train station about 90 minutes before the attack.

SHANE Gordon Adams was on parole for a vicious assault and had six good behaviour bonds on his head for domestic violence when he walked up to an innocent woman getting out of her vehicle in a Maitland carpark and starting punching her in the face.

“Don’t scream or I’m going to stab you,’’ Adams said to his terrified victim.

So when the woman fought back, Adams grabbed a screwdriver from his pocket and stabbed the woman in one of her calves.

The attack, which occurred about 5.30am on May 4 last year, only stopped when Adams and an unknown second man ran off after a resident woke to the victim’s screams and intervened, chasing Adams down a street and apprehending him.

Adams, 24, of Casino, was sentenced to six years and nine months jail on Friday after pleading guilty to one count of robbery in company causing wounding.

But in doing so, Adams also asked Newcastle District Court judge Roy Ellis to take into account six other good behaviour bonds he had been given for a series of domestic violence incidents involving two women.

Adams was also still on parole after being jailed on a charge of assault occasioning actual bodily harm. 

Judge Ellis set a non-parole period of four years for Adams, although he ordered that the thug spend at least nine months in a residential rehabiliation program to be treated for substance abuse and anger management before being allowed back into the community on parole.

The court heard how the victim remained significantly traumatised by the attack, where she had one of her front teeth knocked out and suffered bruising and cuts as well as the wound to her leg.

Adams, wearing prison greens and sitting behind glass in the dock, spent most of the 90-minute sentence hearing with his elbows on his thighs and his hands covering his face.

Defence barrister John Fitzgerald told the court that Adams had been read the victim’s impact statement detailing how the woman had been left traumatised physically and mentally following the horrific attack.

Mr Fitzgerald said after hearing the contents, his client replied: “That makes me feel so much worse. I’m really sad. I’m so sorry.’’

The court heard Adams had also told a jail psychiatrist: “It is the most serious thing I ever did. I feel really bad. She would be traumatised by my stupid actions...”

Mr Fitzgerald quoted from a report stating Adams had endured a “grossly compromised and dysfunctional upbringing’’ but that the 24-year-old had not wanted to blame his upbringing for the attack.

He said Adams had severe substance abuse issues and was so intoxicated on the morning of the attack that he could not remember much of the incident.

Adams and the second, unidentified man got off the XPT at Maitland railway station about 4am on the morning of the attack.

They wandered around the city until they saw the victim parking her car in the carpark between Albion and Moore streets about 5.30am.

She saw the men, felt uncomfortable and decided to wait until they walked past.

She then unlocked the doors before Adams reefed it open, the door smashing into a car parked adjacent to it, and the attack began.

The woman was punched up to six times in the face and manhandled before Adams stabbed her with the screwdriver.

The woman’s screams woke resident Marc Grayson, who went to her aid, eventually detaining Adams in a laneway off Elgin Street.

Mr Grayson also had a hold of the second suspect before he worked free of Mr Grayson’s grasp and escaped.

Despite a significant investigation by Maitland detectives, the second attacker has never been found.

Judge Ellis said Adams had spent a significant amount of the past 10 years locked away and there was concerns he may have already become institutionalised.

He said the victim should “take pride” in standing up for herself and wished her a speedy recovery.