20 years' jail for quiet hitman Sean Waygood

The Merewether hitman who led a double life that deceived his friends, work mates and family was jailed for 20 years yesterday for his role in the murder of Terry Falconer and two shootings.

Sean Laurence Waygood, who is rumoured to be the central character in the fourth series of Underbelly, will serve a minimum 15 years in jail after Judge Deborah Sweeney gave him a 50 per cent discount on his sentence for his assistance to authorities.

The former army commando pleaded guilty to numerous charges, the most serious were conspiracy to murder and accessory to murder. The accessory charge related to the kidnap and murder of convicted drug dealer Falconer while he was on day release from prison.

Waygood and two accomplices posed as Federal police when they staged an arrest at a smash repair yard in Sydney's west on November 16, 2001, court documents stated.

They drugged Falconer, locked him in a toolbox and drove him to a property at Girvan, south-west of Bulahdelah. Falconer died during the journey.

They removed Falconer's teeth, stood him up using a block and tackle system, then sawed him into pieces.

They put the body parts into plastic bags and dumped the bags in the Hastings River, Wauchope, where they were discovered over the ensuing months. Police believe Falconer had information about the 1993 double murder of an elderly couple in Sydney's west and was willing to tell police about the drug activities of some bikie gangs. Waygood led police last year to where saws were buried on the Girvan property.

He was also sentenced for the attempted murder of a man at a Sydney bar in October, 2002.

Waygood's target was a Bandido bikie or the son of the bikie, but Waygood shot the wrong man eight times in a case of mistaken identity.

The victim survived.

Waygood was also sentenced for shooting a man in the buttocks outside a western Sydney hotel in October, 2001.

Waygood previously told the court that he committed the crime and others to either repay debts or out of fear for his own life. Judge Sweeney said the "kill or be killed ethos has no place in society."

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