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WE SHALL REMEMBER THEM: Each Anzac Day, commemorative services are held across the nation at dawn – the time of the original landing.

WE SHALL REMEMBER THEM: Each Anzac Day, commemorative services are held across the nation at dawn – the time of the original landing.

Benediction

Dean of Newcastle the Very Reverend Stephen Williams

The National Anthem

Advance Australia Fair

Shadows of Sacrifice

  •  When: 10am - 5pm, daily and ongoing
  • Where: Newcastle Museum
  • Toilets: Within Newcastle Museum
  • Parking: Honeysuckle Precinct car parks
  • Public Transport: Train to Hamilton Station and Bus 110 to Civic Station 

Newcastle’s Great War 1914-1918 continues with a new instalment of the Shadows of Sacrifice exhibition at Newcastle Museum looking at the events of 1915 and the dehumanisation of warfare.

1915 saw Novocastrians fight and die in the disastrous invasion of Gallipoli. Across the globe, atrocities were committed against civilians, fear of poison gas became a reality and cities were targeted in strategic aerial bombing campaigns. At home, Newcastle started its life as a city of steel with the opening of BHP.

From a population of less than five million, almost 417,000 Australians served in the war. Ten thousand of these volunteers came from Newcastle and the Hunter, where the impact of the war is still felt today.

ANZAC Field of Remembrance

  • Where: Newcastle Museum
  • When: 5am - 3.30pm
  • Toilets: Within Newcastle Museum
  • Parking: Honeysuckle Precinct car parks
  • Public Transport: Train to Hamilton Station and Bus 110 to Civic Station

Newcastle Museum will honour the lives of the men and women lost in war by once again creating a field of crosses and poppies for ANZAC Day.

Firing of the Guns and Open Day

  • Where: Fort Scratchley
  • When: 12pm - 4pm,
  • Fort Times: 12pm - 4pm,
  • Guns Times: 1pm and 3pm
  • Toilets: Within Fort Scratchley
  • Parking: On-street, Horseshoe Beach car park, Nobbys car park one and two.
  • Public Transport: Train to Hamilton Station and Bus 110 to Newcastle Station

A four-gun Salute to the Fallen by the Mark 7 guns at Fort Scratchley will be conducted at the conclusion of the Dawn Service at approximately 6am, this represents the Navy, Army, Air Force and ANZAC.

At 1pm and 3pm the firing by the historic Mark 7 guns that fired on the Japanese submarine on the 8 June 1942, will be supported by the fully restored World War II 25 Pounder Field Gun.

The Fort Scratchley historic 150cm Carbon Arc Search Light will light up Nobbys Beach, Nobbys Lighthouse and Christ Church Cathedral prior to the commencement of the ANZAC Day Dawn Service.

The Fort Museum will be opened to visitors from 12pm to 4pm.

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For more information, visit http://newcastle.nsw.gov.au/Explore/Things-to-do/ANZAC-Day

History of the Anzac Tradition

The ANZAC tradition’s ideals of courage, endurance and mateship, which are still relevant today, were born on 25 April 1915 when the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula. It was the start of a campaign that lasted eight months and resulted in some 25,000 Australian casualties, including 8,700 who died of wounds or disease.

The men who served on the Gallipoli Peninsula created a legend, adding the word ‘Anzac’ to our vocabulary and creating the notion of the Anzac spirit.

In 1916, the first anniversary of the landing was observed in Australia, New Zealand and England and by troops in Egypt. That year, 25 April was officially named ‘Anzac Day’ by the Acting Prime Minister, George Pearce.

By the 1920s, Anzac Day ceremonies were held throughout Australia. All States had designated Anzac Day as a public holiday.

In the 1940s, Second World War veterans joined parades around the country.

In the ensuing decades, returned servicemen and women from the conflicts in Korea, Malaya, Indonesia, Vietnam and Iraq, veterans from allied countries and peacekeepers joined the parades.

During the 1960s and 1970s, the number of people attending the ceremonies fell as Australians questioned the relevance of Anzac Day.

However, in the 1990s there was a resurgence of interest in Anzac Day, with attendances, particularly by young people, increasing across Australia and with many making the pilgrimage to the Gallipoli Peninsula to attend the Dawn Service.

Australians recognise  April 25 as a day of national remembrance, which takes two forms. Commemorative services are held across the nation at dawn – the time of the original landing, while later in the day, former servicemen and women take part in marches.

As we commemorate 100 years of ANZAC 1915 to1918, this year ANZAC Day Commemorations will focus on the Western Front, the principal theatre of operations for British and Dominion forces for the duration of the First World War.

Though called the Western Front by French, British and Dominions it was in fact the German western front - their eastern front was in Russia.

The narrow war zone of the Western Front ran continuously from the English Channel near Ostende to Belfort on the Swiss border, a distance of approximately 760 kilometres.

Information provided by the Australian War Memorial

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