Suburb profile: Wallsend

SUBURB SNAPSHOT

It’s the ‘gateway’ suburb you encounter after leaving the freeway, has its own bustling commercial centre and the charming period homes of yesteryear. 

These factors – combined with its relative affordability – make Wallsend one of the suburbs agents are tipping to next jump out of the gates. 

11 kilometres west of the CBD, Wallsend was named after an English town in Durham. After the first coal mine was established in the area around 1860, the population grew rapidly. The 1989 earthquake resulted in the demolition of some of Wallsend’s historic buildings but the suburb has retained much of its old-world feel. 

As a hub for the city’s western suburbs, Wallsend has a thriving commercial precinct.

LIFESTYLE

Wallsend is serviced by a Stockland Mall as well as numerous high street retailers, medical specialists and a large Bunnings Warehouse. 

Federal Park is a hive of activity on weekends and the suburb has its own swimming centre. 

HISTORIC APPEAL: Wallsend is known for its miners cottages and federation homes, which are often popular with buyers for their prized period features.

HISTORIC APPEAL: Wallsend is known for its miners cottages and federation homes, which are often popular with buyers for their prized period features.

Some of Wallsend’s more upmarket homes can be found in the Silver Ridge Estate, while charming period properties line Robert, Brooks and Campbell Streets. 

The southern area has been rapidly growing, attracting young families for the large blocks and proximity to schools. The university belt to the west primarily attracts investors looking to capitalise on the demand for student accommodation. 

FROM THE EXPERTS 

-From Chad Dunn, Century 21 Novocastrian 

Not only does Wallsend have great parks and sporting facilities but it is fast becoming known as the ‘Parramatta of Newcastle’ in investment circles around the country. 

VIBRANT: Crowds enjoy the Wallsend Winter Fair on Nelson Street. The event attracts around 30,000 visitors to the suburb each year. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

VIBRANT: Crowds enjoy the Wallsend Winter Fair on Nelson Street. The event attracts around 30,000 visitors to the suburb each year. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

This is because the suburb offers incredible value, being close to the freeway, university and new estates of Fletcher and Cameron Park – as well as being right on the arterial transport link to the city. 14 square kilometres in size, the suburb’s housing stock offers something for buyers of all tastes and trends. 

The area has experienced six to eight per cent growth over the last 12 months. Most investor groups around the country have it on their targets for 2017 and beyond as the place to invest.

-Presented by Chad Dunn, Century 21 Novocastrian 

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