From breakfast in bed to brunch on the street, it's all for Mum

QUALITY TIME: Melanie and Rowan Kelly with their daughters Abigail, centre, and Lilah, right. Ms Kelly was treated to breakfast for Mother's Day at the Newcastle City Farmers Markets on Sunday morning. Picture: Max Mason Hubers
QUALITY TIME: Melanie and Rowan Kelly with their daughters Abigail, centre, and Lilah, right. Ms Kelly was treated to breakfast for Mother's Day at the Newcastle City Farmers Markets on Sunday morning. Picture: Max Mason Hubers

In years gone by, a typical Mother’s Day usually entailed eggs on toast, served warm in bed. 

In 2017, cafe brunches and farmers markets proved popular as many Novocastrians opted to take their celebrations to the city’s many eat streets. 

But regardless of the venue, the message was the same; one of love and gratitude for that all-important woman in their life. 

Mother-of-two Melanie Kelly was treated to breakfast at the Newcastle City Farmers Markets on Sunday morning. That was after the unwrapping of homemade gifts from her daughters Lilah, 8, and Abigail, 5. 

“It’s been lovely,” she said. “We like to graze amongst the food.” 

They also picked up a bouquet of purple chrysanthemums, which they would later take to Nanna in Charlestown. 

“She’s a very good woman to our family,” Ms Kelly’s husband Rowan said of his wife. 

”She looks after the girls and her third child, which is me,” he added with a chuckle. “She selected a lot of her presents but her instructions of what to buy were pretty good.” 

There was gridlock getting in and out of Westfield Kotara on Saturday, as shoppers frantically searched for last minute gifts. 

According to the Australian Retailers Association, Australians splurged around $2 billion nationally on Mother’s Day this year.

That took in gifts purchased in the lead up to the day and flowers and dining out on the Sunday itself. 

“I think it’s fair to say we’re seeing more and more people … taking mum out for brunch or lunch,” the association’s executive director Russell Zimmerman said. 

“That’s done for a number of reasons, it’s a little bit easier than doing it at home.

“It’s also the cafe culture … and the way we tend to eat these days. In the past we would have had people to our homes for the Sunday roast.” 

Mr Zimmerman said the day was a much needed boost to retail coffers, after discretionary spending went backwards in March. 

“It’s a bit tough out there at the moment,” he said. 

According to restaurant booking website Dimmi, lunch remains the meal of choice for Mother's Day celebrations, with 47 per cent of diners opting for a middle of the day meal. 

After Valentine's Day, Mother's Day is the second-biggest dining day of the year for the restaurant industry, which records a 70 per cent increase in bookings compared to a normal Sunday. 

On the Dimmi booking site, modern Australian is the top cuisine of choice, followed by Italian, Indian, Japanese and Greek.