Joe Cinque's mother says she will 'never, ever' forgive the woman who killed her son

TRAGIC: Joe Cinque with Anu Singh. Ms Singh was convicted for the manslaughter of Mr Cinque.

TRAGIC: Joe Cinque with Anu Singh. Ms Singh was convicted for the manslaughter of Mr Cinque.

THE mother of Joe Cinque says she will “never, ever” forgive the woman who killed her son.

Twenty years after Newcastle-born Cinque was drugged and killed by his girlfriend, Anu Singh, at their home in Canberra, his mother Maria Cinque has opened up about the pain the family has suffered for two decades.

In an interview with the Seven network’s Sunday Night, Ms Cinque and her husband, Nino, who live in Charlestown, rejected a tearful apology from Ms Singh, calling the woman, who in 1999 was sentenced to 10 years in jail for the manslaughter, “the devil”.

“What I call you is not your name, because you don’t deserve a name, I call you the devil because you are the devil,” Ms Cinque said.

“Monster. You have destroyed my family. You killed the most precious thing I had in my life.”

Ms Singh, who served four years in prison, appeared on the program to seek forgiveness from Joe’s family.

“I would like to say to them that I am deeply, deeply sorry for what happened,” Ms Singh told journalist Steve Pennells.

ANGRY: Maria Cinque, Joe's mother, says time has not healed the pain of her son's death. PICTURE: Jonathan Carroll

ANGRY: Maria Cinque, Joe's mother, says time has not healed the pain of her son's death. PICTURE: Jonathan Carroll

“If there was any way I could turn back the clock I would do so in a heartbeat.

“This has affected me [and] a number of people’s lives ... if I could have listened to people and sought the right sought of mental health help then this wouldn’t have happened.”

Joe Cinque died after he was drugged with Rohypnol and then injected with a lethal dose of heroin by Ms Singh, at their Canberra flat 20 years ago.

The couple both attended high school at St Francis Xavier’s College. Singh then studied law at the Australian National University, and had developed a plan to kill the young engineer, and herself, after hosting a “send off” dinner party with friends and acquaintances. But while people at the party knew of her plan, none of them told Joe, and no one stopped her.

When the first attempt failed, she organised a second dinner party to try again.

The program heard from professor Paul Mullen, the forensic psychiatrist whose testimony that Ms Singh was suffering from a mental disorder and severe depressive illness at the time of Mr Cinque’s death helped her avoid a murder sentence, and from detective sergeant Greg Ranse, who believed Ms Singh “fooled” the judge. 

The program heard the Ms Singh had intended for the couple to die as part of a “suicide pact” but that Mr Cinque had no idea about the plan.

GONE: Joe Cinque was a student at St Francis Xavier’s College and grew up near Newcastle.

GONE: Joe Cinque was a student at St Francis Xavier’s College and grew up near Newcastle.

Detective Sergeant Ranse said that the fact that nobody at the two parties intervened and spoke to Joe was “a question of morality” that those people needed to “explore themselves”.

Ms Cinque, whose son is buried in Whitebridge, said the 20 years later the pain of losing her son had not eased.

“People tell you after so many years the pain goes away, but I think all the time, where’s my son's family, where’s the grandkids he was going to give me?” Ms Cinque said.

“Where are they? I’m not going to have that anymore, and why?

“Because of that demon that killed my son for nothing.”

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