Gregory John Thompson found guilty of murdering ex-wife's new boyfriend Michael Moad at Cessnock in 2015

Michael Moad. Picture: Louise Scott

Michael Moad. Picture: Louise Scott

OBSESSION OF A KILLER

BAIL DECISION REVEALED 

KILLER’S MAJOR DEPRESSION BEFORE ATTACK 

IT wasn’t a split-second flash of rage that led Gregory John Thompson to brutally stab his ex-wife’s new boyfriend to death at Cessnock in 2015.

It was calculated, cold-blooded murder.

And it wasn’t a “loss of control”, or an overreaction to being goaded by a love rival, but a planned attack and the execution of years of threats and abusive text messages. 

Thompson, 52, of Nulkaba, was on Tuesday found guilty of murder over the horrific death of Michael Moad, who was stabbed 10 times in the laundry of his Edgeworth Street home on March 1, 2015. 

Thompson had pleaded guilty to manslaughter, but not guilty to murder on the first day of his trial, raising a partial defence of substantial impairment by way of “abnormality of the mind” due to an underlying condition, which he said affected his capacity to either understand events, judge right from wrong or control himself at the time of the killing. 

After a nine-day trial in Newcastle Supreme Court, it took a jury a little over four hours to reject the defence claims that Thompson was substantially impaired by a major depressive illness when he stabbed Mr Moad.

A large contingent of Mr Moad’s family and friends let out a sigh of relief and a cry of “yes” as the verdict was read out.

Thompson showed no emotion from the court dock before glancing at Mr Moad’s family and then his own. 

The jury had previously heard the stabbing followed years of psychological abuse, a messy divorce and escalating tensions between Thompson and his ex-wife, Karen Thompson. 

Thompson had been arrested twice in two days in the lead-up to the murder – once for harassing his ex-wife and then for following her and Mr Moad and breaching an apprehended violence order.

When he was released on bail on February 28 he put a plan in place to kill Mr Moad and then himself. 

“Justice was done for Michael,” Mr Moad’s brother-in-law, Stephen Scott, told Fairfax Media after the verdict. 

“It’s a relief for the family. 

“It’s been two-and-a-bit years of hell. “Hopefully we can move on from this. 

“We’re never going to forget Michael or the horrific circumstances in which he died. 

“But we believe justice and common sense has prevailed.”

Thompson will be sentenced later this week. 

EARLIER STORY:

CAUGHT: Police surround Gregory John Thompson's car outside Michael Moad's house in Cessnock on March 1, 2015.

CAUGHT: Police surround Gregory John Thompson's car outside Michael Moad's house in Cessnock on March 1, 2015.

GREGORY John Thompson has been found guilty of the brutal stabbing murder of his ex-wife’s new boyfriend at Cessnock in 2015. 

After a nine-day trial it took a jury a little over four hours to reach a verdict in Newcastle Supreme Court on Tuesday. 

Thompson, 52, of Nulkaba, had pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the first day of his trial, admitting he was responsible for stabbing Cessnock man Michael Moad 10 times in the laundry of Mr Moad’s Edgeworth Street home in the early hours of March 1, 2015.

But he had pleaded not guilty to murder, raising a partial defence of substantial impairment by way of “abnormality of the mind” due to an underlying condition, which he said affected his capacity to either understand events, judge right from wrong or control himself at the time of the killing. 

The key issue in the trial was Thompson's mental state around the time of Mr Moad's horrific death, with the jury ultimately rejecting defence claims that he was substantially impaired by a major depressive illness. 

The jury had previously heard that the stabbing followed years of psychological abuse, a messy divorce and escalating tensions between Thompson and his ex-wife, Karen Thompson. 

Thompson had been arrested twice in two days in the lead-up to the murder – once for harassing his ex-wife and then for following her and Mr Moad and breaching an apprehended violence order.

Both times he was granted police bail.  

A large contingent of Mr Moad’s family and friends let out a sigh of relief and a cry of “yes” as the verdict was read out.

Thompson showed no emotion before glancing at Mr Moad’s family and then his own. 

Thompson will be sentenced later this week. 

More to come. 

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