AN emotional Alan Scorse celebrated Nadacheva's win at Broadmeadow on Saturday.

EMOTIONAL: Alan Scorse enjoyed Nadacheva's win at Newcastle on Saturday.

EMOTIONAL: Alan Scorse enjoyed Nadacheva's win at Newcastle on Saturday.

AN emotional Alan Scorse heaped praise on son Mathew and champion jockey Robert Thompson after the narrow win of outsider Nadacheva at Broadmeadow on Saturday.

The six-year-old gelding paid $18 for his win in the 1400-metre Benchmark Handicap.

After drawing barrier 12, the evergreen Thompson produced another gem of a ride to lift Nadacheva over the line a half-length ahead of Kasharn and Drill Master.

Scorse, who was close to tears after the race, has been suffering from a brain tumour behind his eye for the past 12 months.

“It has been a tough battle but my specialist gave me a good report during the week and Nadacheva’s win today put the icing on the cake,’’ he said.

“My wife Sharon’s dad, Roy Hinton, passed away three weeks ago, so today’s win gave us a boost.

“With me being so ill, my son Mathew has been a tower of strength, riding all the horses in their work and keeping the stable going.

“Robert Thompson and I were great rivals when I was riding and he has ridden plenty of winners for me since I started training.

“It was a great ride today from the bad barrier.’’

Meanwhile, Wauchope-based apprentice Jackson Murphy rode his first two winners on a provincial track: Bolly ($12) in the three-year-old maiden handicap over 1200 metres, and Billabong Cindy ($6.50) in the class 2 handicap over 900 metres.

Murphy, from the Central Coast, is apprenticed to Wauchope trainer Grant Prosser.

He was sidelined for months after a horror fall at Taree last year when he suffered a ruptured spleen and liver, punctured lung and three broken ribs.

“It has been a great day and it was so good to ride the two winners in front of my mum and sister, who were in the stand,’’ a delighted Murphy said after his second victory.

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