A car tattoo to mark the Supercars event in Newcastle

Inked: A bloke displays his VK Commodore leg tattoo. The Supercars event in Newcastle could well inspire more of this body art.
Inked: A bloke displays his VK Commodore leg tattoo. The Supercars event in Newcastle could well inspire more of this body art.

We’ve decided to get a new tattoo. Basically, it’s time to get inked. Everyone else is doing it, so why can’t we?

We were inspired by a Newcastle City Council flyer about the Supercars event. It turns out that the flyer is fake, but that’s not stopping us.

The flyer spoke about “pop-up” villages planned in parks for the Supercars event.

The villages were to have “official merchandise outlets and a tattoo marquee”.

This got us thinking. Why not combine the two? Anyone up for a Holden or Ford tattoo? 

But back to the fake flyer. A Topics spy said it was put in letterboxes around Bar Beach.

A Newcastle council spokesman said the flyer sent hearts racing for a moment or two, but then they realised it was bogus. 

“It was written tongue-in-cheek, but they crossed the line in naming a council officer and publishing a logo,” the spokesman said.

Someone put quite a bit of effort into producing the flyer. Someone, we reckon, was up to a bit of election mischief.

The council has called in forensic investigators to find out who created the flyers because they are illegal. We’re just kidding. The council is taking the flyers with a grain of salt.

The Man of Steel

When we read that UK billionaire Sanjeev Gupta was in Newcastle last week, we took notice. 

Gupta has been dubbed the “man of steel” for reviving failing steel production companies. He’s also known for looking after workers. 

The billionaire’s company Liberty House is the new owner of OneSteel’s Mayfield steel mill.

Gupta has a strong interest in renewable energy and green power. It’d be nice if he invested a few quid in the Hunter in those areas, wouldn’t it?

Headspace

Astronauts on a spacewalk at the International Space Station.

Astronauts on a spacewalk at the International Space Station.

Have you ever wondered how astronauts cope with being shot into space on a rocket and floating in the abyss around the big blue marble? And what about spacewalks?

That’d be a mind trip for anyone. This is probably why NASA is funding clinical trials, examining mental health treatments for astronauts on long-duration space missions.

The trials will be done with the free online mental health tool, myCompass, which was developed by researchers at Australia’s Black Dog Institute.

Dr Janine Clarke, of the Black Dog Institute, said the study would help researchers gain critical insights.

“Astronauts are only human and, just like the rest of us, they are not immune to mental suffering,” Dr Clarke said.

“With missions to Mars expected to take over two years to complete, equipping astronauts with strategies to handle extreme physical environments and psychological distress is vital.”

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