Tim McCurdy and Steph Ryan taken aback by euthanasia poll

NORTH East MP Tim McCurdy does not believe 84 per cent of voters in his electorate support euthanasia.

The Nationals politician was reacting to a phone poll conducted in his seat of Ovens Valley, which saw 84 per cent of respondents back assisted dying.

They answered yes to the question “if a terminally ill patient, asks a doctor for a lethal dose, should a doctor be allowed to provide a lethal dose, or not?”.

The survey was conducted on behalf of pro-euthanasia group Go Gentle Australia and involved 1000 people.

The same question was asked in the seat of Euroa, also in north-east Victoria, resulting in 85 per cent approval of assisted dying.

Both Mr McCurdy and Euroa MLA Steph Ryan were surprised at the high level of support.

“I would go so far as to say I don’t think the entire electorate would be 84 per cent,” Mr McCurdy said.

“I can only go on the feedback I’m getting and I would say it’s 50-50, I’m still getting as many pro as anti coming in.”

Ms Ryan said: “I was a bit surprised that the number was that high, I certainly feel that there is a lot of passive support for it around the electorate.”

The Nationals MPs are undecided on Victoria’s assisted dying bill which is due to face a conscience vote in parliament next week.

Go Gentle polled Ovens Valley and Euroa because of that indecision with campaign director Paul Price saying costs meant other electorates, such as Benambra, were not covered.

Undecided: Member for Ovens Valley Tim McCurdy says he is unlikely to resolve his stance on legalising euthanasia until next week's parliamentary debate on an assisted dying bill.

Undecided: Member for Ovens Valley Tim McCurdy says he is unlikely to resolve his stance on legalising euthanasia until next week's parliamentary debate on an assisted dying bill.

"We were keen to poll as many Victorian electorates as possible to measure voters support for voluntary assisted dying but, with our limited funds, it was not possible to poll every one," Mr Price said.

Voters were also asked if their MP backed the bill would it influence their support at the next election.

In Euroa, 47 per cent said they more likely to vote for them, 39 per cent said it would not make a difference and 9 per cent said they would be less likely.

In Ovens Valley, there was also 47 per cent in the more likely category, 43 per cent saying it would make no difference and 7 per cent less likely.

The Border Mail