The 100th anniversary of the Battle of Beersheba

No Horsing Around: Sam Dhnaram helps preserve the history of the Australian Light Horse. Picture: Ryan Osland.
No Horsing Around: Sam Dhnaram helps preserve the history of the Australian Light Horse. Picture: Ryan Osland.

Swansea’s Sam Dhnaram and his horse Albert are good mates. Most of the time.

“Sometimes we call him Albert and sometimes we call him something else,” Sam joked, adding that his equine pal was occasionally a pain in the you-know-what.

“He’s a high-spirited horse.”

But the pair are inseparable.

“Every spare bit of time I’ve got, I spend with him. My wife is always going crook. She says ‘who are you married to, me or the horse?’,” Sam said.

Sam, 79, is a proud member of the Australian Light Horse Association – a group that preserves the history and tradition of the light horsemen, and their horses, who served their country in war and peace.

Sam will join members of the association to ride in a parade at Murrurundi on Saturday to mark the 100th anniversary of the charge of Australian troops and horses into gunfire at the Battle of Beersheba in Israel during World War I.

He’ll also be at Muswellbrook on Tuesday for the unveiling of a statue that pays tribute to the Light Horse regiments.

“Nobody could explain how I feel to get on a horse and ride on this type of occasion. I can’t put it into words, you probably could,” Sam said.

“It’s not only that I ride on a light horse, I’m also giving thanks to the soldiers that died for us to have a free country.

“To me, I pay tribute to them for helping to ensure that we live under the Australian flag, not a foreign one – like a German or Turkish flag.

“The flag means that we’re united as one. That we’ll never give up our freedom, ever.”

Books and Bombs

Old books are on display at Newcastle City Library.

Old books are on display at Newcastle City Library.

What would we do without books, hey?

We admit that we have evolved to ebooks. But sometimes we still read physical books. We love the smell and feel of them. Sometimes the words inside are good, too.

At the unveiling of Newcastle’s new city library on Thursday, some old books from the basement were put on display as part of a “retro reference” collection. 

There were some pretty interesting titles like Fun With A Saw, The Art of Whittling and The Bomb, Survival and You.

The book about surviving the bomb was published in 1955, during the Cold War, when the prospect of a nuclear winter was a clear and present danger.

It might be time to reissue that book, what with Trump and Kim Jong-un going head-to-head.

Having a Gaytime

Streets has launched its new “Golden Gaytime Sanga”.

The revered ice cream company says its new product has “improved crumb technology”.

“We know Aussies love a Gaytime and we know they love a sandwich, so why not give them something they’d go nuts over,” Streets marketing guru Scott Mingl said.

We’re sending one to Tony Abbott.

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