The Minmi Magster thanks old Hughie for sending down the rain

Green grass: Bob Skelton shows the results of his rain poem on his Minmi property. “The clover’s gone ballistic out here,” he said.
Green grass: Bob Skelton shows the results of his rain poem on his Minmi property. “The clover’s gone ballistic out here,” he said.

What a difference a bit of rain makes, hey?

Bob “Minmi Magster” Skelton, a renowned Hunter bush poet, knows this all too well.

As Topics exclusively revealed on Monday, the Magster’s powerful rain poem brought on last weekend’s weather and recent storms.

Before the Magster began reciting his poem, his Minmi property was parched.

“It was as bare as a badger’s bum before we got all this rain,” the Magster said.

He began to regularly recite his poem, which starts like this: Rain rain fall on down; quench the thirsty land around; fill the dams, the rivers and creeks. Send her down Hughie and send us heaps.

Hughie, for those who don’t know, is the weather god. “Send ’er down, Hughie!” is an iconic Aussie phrase, calling for rain.

Since the Magster’s call to Hughie, his Minmi property has been revived.

“The clover’s gone ballistic out here,” he said.

Does the Magster have some kind of special channel to the divine?

“Yeah, a line of communication,” he joked.

“One bloke now wants me to write a poem about him winning Lotto.”

What about the Knights? Can you help them out this season?

“I’ve written that many poems for the Knights. I’ve given up on them,” he said.

The Magster has written a new poem “to thank old Hughie for sendin’ ’er down”.

Here it is: Thanks old Hughie for the rain ya' sent; It certainly has been teeming; When I heard it on my old tin roof; I thought I was surely dreaming. Now our creek is runnin’ once again; Our dam is full and flowin’ over; And along the old track, across the flat; There’s a heap of new green clover. But we didn’t need that storm ya’ sent hittin’ old Kurri town; Damaging roofs and buildings; Blowing walls and awnings down. Anyhow thanks old Hughie for the rain ya’ sent; But I’m now asking you this my friend; Next time be a bit more bloody careful; With the size of the storms ya’ send.

The Eagle and the Cat

Topics read on a Hunter lost pets Facebook page about an eagle allegedly flying off with a black cat in its talons at Maryland.

Topics wasn’t able to verify this, but it did pique our curiosity.

One comment said: “I lost an eight-week old Jack Russell pup to an eagle. I was visiting my uncle's farm near Rylstone 10 years ago. We were out playing between the chook pen and the house, so I think the eagle was lining up a chook and got my pup instead.”

We did find this on the NSW environment department’s website that 80 to 90 per cent of a wedge-tailed eagle’s diet was “made up of ground-dwelling animals, including mammals and reptiles”.

“Rabbits, wallabies and small kangaroos form the main part of their diet, although they will also eat snakes, lizards, large birds, possums, foxes and feral cats.”

  • topics@theherald.com.au
Bob Skelton reciting his rain poem when his Minmi land was bone dry.

Bob Skelton reciting his rain poem when his Minmi land was bone dry.