Remembrance Day 2017 Newcastle Civic Park ceremony | photos

The Hunter’s fallen were remembered in a moment of silent reflection on Saturday.

Newcastle and the Hunter marked the end of World War I hostilities in moving Remembrance Day commemorations across the region.

The service in Civic Park concentrated on the sacrifices of the fallen in what was meant to be “the war to end all wars”.

Saturday’s ceremony in Newcastle was attended by many local military and political dignitaries. 

Australians suffer on Western Front

One hundred years ago on November 10 the bloody series of First World War battles known as the Third Battle of Ypres came to an end. 

For Australian soldiers on the Western Front, these battles would become infamous for their cost in human life – for little gain.

British Field Marshal Douglas Haig planned an offensive to break through strongly-fortified German defences on ridges flanking the devastated Belgian town of Ypres.  He had amassed a combined force of around a million British, Anzac and Canadian soldiers. Read the full account.

 SHATTERED: Soldiers from the 4th Division AIF field artillery during the Battle of Passchendaele in October 1917. PHOTO: Frank Hurley (Australia, 1885-1962); AWM E01220

SHATTERED: Soldiers from the 4th Division AIF field artillery during the Battle of Passchendaele in October 1917. PHOTO: Frank Hurley (Australia, 1885-1962); AWM E01220

Veteran John Fenwick speaks of the importance of Remembrance Day

It’s a day that John Fenwick thinks every young Australian should always recognise. 

On Saturday November 11, Remembrance Day, John will do what has been doing for decades.

He’ll head out to the Maitland RSL Sub-Branch service before taking a few solemn moments to remember the efforts of thousands of young men and women who have served in Australia’s armed forces – including his own, his father, his son and his mates.

 "On Remembrance Day we remember those who gave the ultimate sacrifice to our country,” John said.

“In my opinion it’s a good day. It’s a day when young people should remember these gallant young men who gave their lives for their country.”

He’ll remember his own service, too, which included a 14-month stint in Darwin when it was a constant target for Japanese bombers. Read his story here.

A day to remember: WWII-veteran John Fenwick, who turned 96 this year, will take a moment to remember the sacrifice of friends and family on Saturday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

A day to remember: WWII-veteran John Fenwick, who turned 96 this year, will take a moment to remember the sacrifice of friends and family on Saturday. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers