Black triangle UFO spotted above Munibung Hill in the 1990s

Standing in their Edgeworth front yard one night in the late 1990s, Geoff and Maree Masters saw a massive black triangle-shaped UFO.

“It was around midnight. We were seeing off some visitors, when a huge black triangle seemed to float from north to south very low,” Geoff said.

The story follows a Topics report on Tuesday about a flying saucer that landed in Lambton Park in the 1950s.

Lambton’s Phil Mahoney said his neighbour George Bunn saw the silver craft land in the park and leave behind a circular burn mark, 40 metres in diameter.

Geoff said the black triangle craft that he and his wife spotted was “no more than 700 metres high, but the area it covered was immense”.

“The base of the triangle was the leading edge, with about four or five white lights across it and one white light at the apex – which was the rear of the UFO.

“It was so slow that it took nearly 15 minutes to travel from our first view of it, until it got close to Munibung Hill and turned east and headed out towards the direction of the ocean.

“It made no sound at all and if you missed seeing the lights, there would be a big possibility you would not see it all.”

Geoff said the sighting was “very similar to the Phoenix Lights that were filmed in the USA”.

This case involved several UFOs, including black triangles, spotted by residents of Phoenix in Arizona. 

So, was the craft that Geoff and Maree spotted aliens or a mysterious military plane, like the mythical Aurora – a black triangle-shaped aircraft that many believe was flown under a secret US government military program?

Maree reckons aliens.

“It wasn’t something from our world,” she said.

“It didn’t frighten me, but it makes you realise we’re not the only people in the universe.”

Geoff has seen several UFOs over the years.

“It’s a matter of luck and looking in the right direction at the right time,” he said.

Telemarketer Troubles

Picture this: You’ve had a long hard day at work. You sit down and crack a beer or a bottle of wine. You can smell dinner cooking in the oven.

Jazz is playing in the background at just the right volume and you’re starting to relax.

Then the phone rings. It’s a telemarketer from overseas.

You’ve registered your number with the federal government’s Do Not Call Register, but it doesn’t seem to be working.

How do you respond?

Reader Pat goes with this: “Hello, hello, hello, hello”, acting like she can’t hear the other person on the line.

We’ve also heard this one: “Hi, I’m having dinner right now, can you give me your home number and I’ll call you back during your dinnertime”.

How about this: When the caller asks how you are today, say: “I’m glad you asked. No one these days seems to care. I have all these problems and my arthritis is acting up ...”

Or this: “Okay, I’ll listen to you. But I should probably tell you, I’m not wearing any clothes”.

A telemarketer once wrote that the best way to stop the calls was to say: “Please put me on your do not call list”. 

It’s worth a try, but we like the others.

Send your suggested responses to telemarketers to topics@theherald.com.au.