Learn how to make winemaker's own rosé wine cake | FOOD NEWS

SOMETHING DIFFERENT: Hunter Valley winemaker Gwyn Olsen and her festive Rosélly Christmas cake. Picture: Supplied
SOMETHING DIFFERENT: Hunter Valley winemaker Gwyn Olsen and her festive Rosélly Christmas cake. Picture: Supplied

Hunter Valley winemaker Gwyn Olsen has invented a cool dessert just in time for summer. It’s called the Rosélly and is, as the name suggests, a rosé wine cake. She came up with the idea when transcribing her grandmother’s old recipes and re-discovered the beauty of jelly bundts.

Last summer was all about frozen rosé – or frosé – but Olsen believes the rosé jelly cake could also take off as a quirky new way to enjoy the popular pink wine. 

“It’s easy to make, looks incredible and you can mix it with your favourite fruits. Serve chilled, and it will be the perfect cake to enjoy on a summer picnic,” she told Food & Wine. Try it for yourself by following the instructions below. 

THE DISH

Gwyn Olsen’s Summer Fruits Rosélly

Gwyn Olsen's Rosélly. Picture: Supplied

Gwyn Olsen's Rosélly. Picture: Supplied

INGREDIENTS

• Approximately 1000ml of fruity rosé, such as Gwyn’s Hunter Collective Olsen Rosé (adjust according to the size of your bundt pan)

• 3 tsp gelatine powder or 9 gelatine leaves

• 50g sugar (per 1000ml of rosé)

• Berries or fruits of your choice – with this particular rosé, strawberries work brilliantly

Hunter Valley winemaker Gwyn Olsen and her festive Rosélly Christmas cake. Picture: Supplied

Hunter Valley winemaker Gwyn Olsen and her festive Rosélly Christmas cake. Picture: Supplied

METHOD

Step 1. Combine gelatine powder with 1/4 of the rosé in a bowl and mix well.

Step 2. Heat the remaining rosé and 50g of sugar until hot – don’t let it simmer or boil (you don’t want the alcohol to evaporate or flavours of the rosé.

Step 3. Pour hot rosé into cold rosé/gelatine mixture. Stir until gelatine powder has dissolved.

Step 4. Let rosé cool (to about room temperature). In the meantime, chop strawberries and add berries to the base of the bundt pan.

Step 5. Cover bundt with jelly mixture. Allow to set overnight in the fridge.

Step 6. Dip mould in hot water for five seconds (don’t let water get into the cake). Carefully flip the bundt onto a serving plate, and tada – Rosélly cake. Enjoy with a handful of fresh berries and a glass of rosé.

Dessert bar

Speaking of desserts, what better way to finish a balmy, twilight dinner? Doughheads has launched an eat-in dessert menu featuring the restaurant’s signature doughnut holes loaded with decadent trimmings. 

Think bite-sized balls of fluffy dough smothered in warm Nutella, creamy vanilla bean ice-cream, strawberries and crunchy, toasted hazelnuts. Or, sticky caramel sauce with fresh banana and crushed peanuts.

And then there’s a tribute to the Weis bar – tropical mango coulis paired with golden macadamias, white chocolate shards and crisp toasted coconut flakes.

Doughheads at The Junction have extended their summer trading hours to 9pm from Thursday to Saturday. The restaurant will not be taking reservations, though, so plan ahead.

Hotline Hoagies

FEAST YOUR EYES: The Philly mac’n’cheese steak hoagie, by Hotline Hoagies. Picture: Supplied

FEAST YOUR EYES: The Philly mac’n’cheese steak hoagie, by Hotline Hoagies. Picture: Supplied

You might recall that last month, the Newcastle Herald introduced readers to “Hotline Hoagies”. The Perth-based business is actually the brainchild of Novocastrian Nicholas Brady, who fancies himself as a bit of an amateur boxer as well as a businessman who can cook.

A hoagie is similar to a sub in appearance – but different. Brady says it’s “a Philadelphian name for a sandwich made on a long white Italian roll”. 

He has been in Newcastle visiting family this month and told Food & Wine: “Newy is so ready for Hotline Hoagies. I’m just trying to find the best location. We’ve looked at locations in Charlestown Square, Cooks Hill and Islington. I reckon we should do a pop-up at the top of the Queens Wharf Tower in a protest to say don’t knock it down.”

He is working with suppliers and talking to the council to get the necessary approvals but is hoping to run a few Hotline Hoagies pop-ups in January. Brady has also asked for some input from you, dear reader. Where do you think he should set up a Hotline Hoagies shop? Which suburb? Let Food & Wine know and we can pass it on. 

World class

Dean Gibson and Jon Pryer with the Boneshaker. Picture: Marina Neil

Dean Gibson and Jon Pryer with the Boneshaker. Picture: Marina Neil

Hunter TAFE teacher and chocolate sculptor Dean Gibson has finally destroyed the Boneshaker. You might recall the fully functional steampunk-inspired rhinocerous made entirely from chocolate? It took Gibson and Jim Pryer 12 months to create and revolutionised the competitive world of chocolate sculpting – and dessert making. Next on Gibson’s agenda is preparing for the World Gelato Cup in Italy next month. He is mentoring the Australian team – Martino Piccolo, Donato Toce, Andre Sandison, William Bo Song and Thomas Mitchell. 

Dean Tilden. Picture: Simone De Peak

Dean Tilden. Picture: Simone De Peak

Also in lockdown for a major international competition is fellow Hunter TAFE teacher Dean Tilden. He will compete against the world’s best bakers in Paris in February. He is only the second Australian to bake off in the World Bakery Masters and follows in the footsteps of his coach Brett Noy. 

Fit for a king

Wests City is being relaunched early next year and if the new Kingstown Bar (go online to theherald.com.au for photos) is anything to go by, this is something to look forward to. A highlight is going to be a huge pizza oven for fresh, made-to-order pizzas.

Kingstown Bar, Wests City, Newcastle.

Kingstown Bar, Wests City, Newcastle.

Film festival

Kingstown Bar, Wests City, Newcastle.

Kingstown Bar, Wests City, Newcastle.

The 2018 Hunter Valley Wine, Food and Film Festival will include the premiere of movie Cookery for the Many, as well as for the Upper Ten Thousand. The title is, organisers says, taken from an Australian cooking and dining etiquette book released in 1864. With the help of sponsors, they hope to make a film that can be screened to a wider audience and perhaps become the basis of a television program. For details contact Neal Crisford (0412 564 943; winecountrytv@gmail.com) or Simon Brooker (0402 258 968; simonbrooker1903@gmail.com).

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