Fire Rescue NSW | Hunter report

 Inspector Greg Symonds with Cardiff firefighters Senior Firefighter David Williams, Senior Firefighter John Stanley, Station Officer Brett Arnold and Senior Firefighter Robert Murray
Inspector Greg Symonds with Cardiff firefighters Senior Firefighter David Williams, Senior Firefighter John Stanley, Station Officer Brett Arnold and Senior Firefighter Robert Murray

Last week was extremely busy for Cardiff fire crews. On Monday at 10.40am Cardiff station were called to a house fire at Warners Bay. On arrival, the crew found the house well alight. 

“The flames were ferocious, they were through the roof and shooting 15 metres into the air,” station officer Brett Arnold said. With the owners not at home, neighbours called 000 and managed to rescue Snoopy the dog from the burning home.

 Quick action from firefighters prevented the fire spreading to adjoining premises. Seven fire trucks and Newcastle Hazmat assisted at the scene before the fire was fully extinguished. Later that week, crews from Cardiff and Charlestown attended a train fire in a diesel locomotive at Cardiff train station.

 Senior Firefighter John Stanley said the fire was quickly extinguished and there was only minor disruption to rail services.

R IS FOR RESCUE

All Fire & Rescue NSW firefighters are trained in rescue techniques, and all appliances are equipped with rescue equipment.

This includes door opening tools to allow firefighters to gain access to locked premises in emergency situations, hydraulic cutters to cut through metal to free trapped persons in motor vehicle accidents, as well as cordage packs used to undertake rescues in dangerous environments such as cliffs and rooftops.

Some stations are equipped with additional specialist heavy rescue equipment and firefighters at these stations are trained to deal with large scale rescue incidents.

Firefighters are trained to use hydraulic rescue tools, ropes, winches and power tools, as well as air bags which are used to lift objects.

Rescue incidents can be extremely varied. Whilst motor vehicle accidents require the use of large, powerful hydraulic tools, delicate operations such as the removal of rings and trapped appendages are performed with small, air-powered grinders and hand-driven cutters.