Helping hand for refugees

ALL SMILES: Newcastle MP Sharon Claydon MP and Mine Super's Glenda Abraham with Azim Rasoli and his new computer.
ALL SMILES: Newcastle MP Sharon Claydon MP and Mine Super's Glenda Abraham with Azim Rasoli and his new computer.

STUDYING at university seemed an impossible dream for Azim Rasoli.

Five years ago, he fled his war-torn homeland of Afghanistan as a teenager and after years in limbo, he found his way to Newcastle in 2017 after he was granted a humanitarian visa.

But the dream is a reality. This year, Mr Rasoli takes his first steps towards becoming a nurse when he starts a University of Newcastle Open Foundation enabling program.

“Having this terrible experience is definitely part of me wanting to be a nurse. When I’m able to help people and take care of them it makes me happy,” he said.

“I feel like I’m the luckiest person in the world. It’s such a privilege that I’ve got the opportunity to come here.

“To be able to do university as well is a dream come true.”

On Thursday, Mr Rasoli received a helping hand when he was given a refurbished laptop as part of Mine Super’s donation to Northern Settlement Services.

“Laptops are so expensive, and there was no way I could afford one by myself at the moment,” Mr Rasoli said.

The superannuation fund has donated 10 refurbished computers to Northern Settlement Services, which helps migrants and refugees adapt to life in Australia.

Northern Settlement Services chief executive Lulu Tantos thanked Mine Super.

“This generous donation of laptops and computers will assist a number of young refugee arrivals who have settled in Newcastle under the Humanitarian Settlement Program achieve their dream of higher education and learning,” she said.

Mine Super’s chief engagement officer Glenda Abraham said the fund was proud to support the service’s “valuable work”.