Letters to the editor March 8 2018

HURT: Internationally recognised bowhunter Adam Greentree, of Merewether. Reader Graeme Macy argues there is no sport in killing and unnecessarily injuring wild animals.

HURT: Internationally recognised bowhunter Adam Greentree, of Merewether. Reader Graeme Macy argues there is no sport in killing and unnecessarily injuring wild animals.

ADAM Greentree (“Primal instinct”, Weekender 3/3) says he travels to all parts of Australia, and the planet, to kill mostly innocent, defenceless animals. He is not killing in self defence, or because he is starving, but for what some would call “sport’, the thrill of killing the quarry.

Then he returns home, and in the best tradition of trophy hunters, displays his prowess by posting his “stories and adventures” on the modern equivalent of the wall, social media. This seemingly narcissistic exhilaration that impels the compulsive hunter nowdays was not what drove the Paleolithic hunter.

In my eyes Greenstreet is likely hunting for status. It's like driving a luxury car, though in this case, the lives of animals are taken in the process. 

Hunting with a bow and arrow is gratuitous violence that could be called murder, bloody murder. Greenstreet says he feels remorse every time he takes an animal’s life, but he continues to kill. If he, as he claims as a hunter, appreciates animals so much more than non-hunters or even anti-hunters, why does he not recognise animals as sentient beings with rich and deep cognitive and emotional lives and capacities?

Greenstreet must be aware that even bow hunting by a competent marksman like himself does not result in a rapid and humane death. An animal fatally shot with an arrow can take minutes to die, suffering severe pain from trauma to tissue and organs. There is also a high risk of a non-fatal injury, with animals escaping to die a slow, painful death. Bow hunters need to get very close (no more than 20 metres). Research indicates that from 12 per cent to 48 per cent of wounded deer may escape. Animals shot in the lungs with an arrow drown in their own blood.   

Animals can remain conscious while dying from massive blood loss. Wounded animals not retrieved and killed can suffer disabling injury, pain and wound infection. 

Bow hunters admit to never recovering some 13 percent of animals shot with an arrow from the wild. 

Adam Greenstreet may consider bow hunting to be an ‘art’ or challenge that requires skill and patience, but I don’t think there can be justification for such killing when more humane methods are available. Compound bows are as lethal as any gun, and should be banned. I believe the bow hunting highlighted is an appallingly abhorrent, cruel and sadistic activity.

Graeme Macey, Smiths Lake

PARKING PAIN BRANCHES OUT

THERE are currently numerous developments in Throsby Street at Wickham where, once they are all completed, they will greatly effect parking.

Much has been written about the parking around Honeysuckle with parking being taken away, and much the same is happening around Wickham.

The marina car park is now restricted parking, alongside much of the local streets. I’m flabbergasted to see someone has given approval for trees to be planted on the road in Throsby Street, which is a very narrow street, outside the new apartments, thus taking away more precious parking.

Can someone please enlighten us as to whom gave this approval and why? Please help us locals understand.

Gail Stapleton, Wickham

BRAD Hill (Short Takes, 6/3) perpetuates the myth that the major SA blackout was the fault of renewables. The final report by the Australian Energy Market Operator found that the problem was due to two tornadoes which managed to topple three 50-metre transmission towers.

It's not just “greenies” that are taking advantage of the efficiency and low cost of renewable energy. Yesterday another media publication reported that the huge Stockland company will be investing over $23 million in solar roof top panels because, “investing in technology like solar energy is not only environmentally sustainable, it also makes good business sense”.

In support of that, the NSW Energy minister stated that solar power had helped NSW get through our recent summer without many disruptions. “Penrith was the hottest place on the planet on Sunday, January 7, and on that day at midday, rooftop solar systems across NSW generated around 1000 megawatts of electricity” he said.

Businesses are more powerful than “greenies and do-gooders” at driving the progression of renewable energy, Brad. 

John Arnold, Singleton

BURNING THROUGH COAL

WHEN I did door-knocking recently in Muswellbrook about the future of the coal industry, quite a few people still believed the fairytale that the mining-boom created jobs, even as their shops are closing down and the houses around them are being vacated.

Congratulations to the mining industry for spinning such an illusion. But the same people, when asked, also said there needed to be a plan for a post-mining economy. Well, it appears to me that the fossil fuel industry is determined to do whatever it can to avoid that. 

I was on the Lock the Gate tour, where we were followed by several police cars everywhere we went. It certainly looks like the fossil fuel industry is prepared to subvert even the police in desperation.

But, we can faintly hear the sound of the post-mining boom. As the world increasingly spurns fossil fuels in favour of renewables, it also heralds a time when the impunity of the fossil fuel industry is over.

A day when we no longer pay our taxes so mining companies can have police cars follow us. It would be nice to see the fossil fuel industry off with a boom.

Niko Leka, Mayfield

BOXING BLOW A REAL PAIN

YOUR editorial ("Trump's tariff threat could hurt the Hunter", Opinion 6/3) ignores the threat from our own state government. There is no container terminal at Newcastle port because the state charges an extortionate fee for container shipments for the purpose of making a terminal financially unviable. It pays this fee to the lessee of Port Botany's container port, NSW Ports. 90 per cent of world trade in non-bulk commodities, is conducted using containers. No container port means no access to world trade. That's caused economic damage in the Hunter and northern NSW for 20 years.

Greg Cameron, Wamboin

MOST LIKELY TO LEAD PACK

IS there any truth to the rumour that the Roosters have signed Winx before the June 30 deadline ?

Eddie Niszczot, Thornton

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