Stacer riding with the Revolution | Mark Rothfield

ALL-ROUND PERFORMANCE: The new Stacer 539 Wild Rider with Revolution hull. The new hull is used for most of Stacer's runabouts, console boats, bass boats and bowriders.
ALL-ROUND PERFORMANCE: The new Stacer 539 Wild Rider with Revolution hull. The new hull is used for most of Stacer's runabouts, console boats, bass boats and bowriders.

THE search for one’s first new runabout will take many buyers on a meandering journey past industry pillars like Quintrex and Bayliner, and via some odd outliers from boutique builders, before ending up in some surprising places.

In my brother’s case, it was with Stacer – a 539 Wild Rider bowrider to be exact.

As a slightly lesser-known sister brand to Quintrex, they’re perhaps not your first choice of aluminium boats. But nor is it surprising it was my brother’s last choice.

Boats like Stacer can’t simply rely on reputation to secure sales. They must have both substance – in this case, thicker aluminium – and style.

For a start, Stacer offers smooth hull sides rather than pressed clinker, which looks vastly superior and more easily accommodates a vinyl hull wrap. Beneath that is the revamped Revolution hull, blending the best features of the EVO Advance bottom shape with the concave design formerly seen on Stacer’s bass boats.

Along with a finer bow entry to provide ride softness there’s increased flare from the stem to the chines. The vee shape moderates and becomes quite flat at the stern, which enhances planing ability and stability.

The new hull is employed across most of Stacer's models between 4.29 to 6.2 metres in length – including the runabouts, console boats, bass boats and bowriders. That suggests it’s a genuine all-rounder capable of gliding over offshore swells when fishing and equally at home towing a tube with the family.

“Everyone who has been lucky enough to go for a ride in a Revolution hull is extremely impressed by the performance and it will definitely have an impact on the market once the word gets out,” Stacer national account manager Dominic Smith said.

All models now have fully welded sidedecks for greater strength, as opposed to spot welded, while another nice touch is the rubber gunwale strip.

Some models previously fitted with “level standard” flotation will now revert to the basic standard, which has foam flotation placed under the floor and not in the side panels of the cockpit.

The official explanation is that it’s to “reduce customer confusion regarding types of flotation, to increase storage space, and to facilitate the use of heavier gauge alloy in hulls”.

In a move that makes sense for befuddled buyers, the naming convention for each model has been consolidated according to configuration. For example, the Nomad and Crossfire console boats will collectively be called Crossfire going forward.

Similarly, the Sea Way and Bay Master runabout lines merge into Sea Master, and Stacer’s Easy Rider name has been dropped in favour of Wild Rider, covering the entire bowrider spectrum from 499 through to 619.

The biggest change over the Easy Rider models is that the anchor well has been moved from the foredeck to under the centre bow cushion, creating more seating room without sacrificing functionality.

Newcastle Yamaha Marine at Belmont is the nearest Stacer agent – see newcastleyamaha.com.au

NEW DESIGN, NEW DIRECTION: The very fancy Maritimo's X60, which was unveiled at Sanctuary Cove.

NEW DESIGN, NEW DIRECTION: The very fancy Maritimo's X60, which was unveiled at Sanctuary Cove.

Maritimo unveils x-factor 

EVEN the most ardent Riviera cruiser fan would begrudgingly admire the job that Maritimo has done with the first of its new X series range, the X60, which was unveiled at Sanctuary Cove last week.

It’s arguably the sleekest and sweetest-looking vessel to ever roll out of Bill Barry-Cotter’s Gold Coast factory, with its ‘X-factor’ being an aft cabana in the transom that connects to the vast swim platform area.

The cabana can be customised as a fourth cabin with queen bed, bar, mini galley and beach club, watersports centre and more. It truly makes the most of this valuable relaxation space.

MW Marine opens Port office

MARITIMO and Jeanneau powerboat dealer MW Marine is opening a Port Stephens office to complement their Sydney Harbour head office, with staff member Matt Millington taking up a share in the business.

Millington previously ran a marine mechanical business and undertook project management for major superyacht clients. “The chance to work more closely with such a well-respected dealer such as Matt Willett was not one I could let pass by,” he said.

MW Marine sold 35 outboard-powered Jeanneaus last year and has three Maritimo cruisers under construction for customers. For those with a fishing passion, they also represent the Robalo brand.