Letters to the editor July 10 2018

SCATHING: NSW Police Minister Troy Grant said Archbishop Philip Wilson's sentence was not "within a bull’s roar of being commensurate or appropriate".
SCATHING: NSW Police Minister Troy Grant said Archbishop Philip Wilson's sentence was not "within a bull’s roar of being commensurate or appropriate".

EARLIER this week I watched the NSW Minister for Police chastise a senior NSW magistrate for the sentence handed down to Archbishop Wilson, notwithstanding of course that the proceedings are yet to be finalised.

I was, to say the least, very disappointed that a Minister of the Crown would berate a member of the judiciary as he did in an almost childlike manner on TV .

It was a gutless attack to which the magistrate cannot reply. I very much doubt that the minister had read the sentencing comments of His Honour, who is known and respected for his judicial consideration of all matters that come before him.

I am not aware of any comments by the Attorney-General in reply to the attack by Minister Grant as one would expect of the one person who can speak publicly in support of the judiciary but that, I suppose, is politics. To add to immature comments, I am not aware of the NSW Attorney-General Mark Speakman.

John Anthony, Wickham

ALL ABOUT A FAIR SHARE

I BELIEVE the Member of the Legislative Council (MLC) from Guyra, Scot MacDonald, has again demonstrated just how out of touch he is with his Hunter portfolio (Letters 9/7). Has he missed the inconsistent application of regional and metropolitan funding definitions that serve this government’s blatant pork barrelling or is he just part of the problem? The latter, I would suggest.

Or perhaps it is because the Hunter is still not represented at the Cabinet table, where the real decisions are made and advocacy for your portfolio can be achieved.

A case in point would be the two separate sports grants programs that currently provide funding streams for sports infrastructure in metropolitan and regional areas (“Status anxiety in suburbs”, Herald 16/4). Absurdly, Newcastle is ineligible for both! Many sporting groups in our community have raised these concerns with me, and as a result NSW Labor will act to fix this.

The Parliamentary Secretary for the Hunter Mr MacDonald reacts very strongly to my advocacy on behalf of organisations that continually miss out. I have obviously hit a sore point. At the end of the day all that the Newcastle community wants, and quite frankly deserves, is a fair and consistent approach to funding streams available from the NSW government and I will continue to advocate for this. We just want a fair shot at our fair share.

Tim Crakanthorp, Newcastle MP

A BLOW TO THE ARGUMENT

DAVID Rose (Letters 4/7), doesn't appear to understand the capacity factor term as applied to wind energy.  Averaged over an extended time, capacity factor (CF) measures actual power generated compared to theoretical capacity. It is not improved by technology but relates more to variable wind conditions.

A CF of 30% is quite generous. In Australia, most wind farms regularly fail to achieve even 30%. They may hit 50% of nameplate at times but never maintain a high CF over a long period. A wind farm in Bavaria averages only 12%. In Australia this June, there were many days where CF for all of our windfarms was 10% or less.

To the other point, I believe Professor Ray Wills of University of Western Australia is well known as an environmental academic/activist.  He has many business interests providing services to renewable energy and sustainability. I think his prediction that most cities between the 26th parallels will be self-powered using wind, solar and batteries by 2025 is laughable. Most of the world's population live outside those latitudes. Not one major city has got even close to doing that yet. And 2025 is only 6.5 years away. Well done, professor.

Peter Devey, Merewether

TOO MANY TARRED AS ONE

A FEMALE healthcare professional in England has been arrested on suspicion of murdering eight babies and the attempted murder of another six babies. A total of 17 suspicious deaths of babies are currently under investigation. I believe we need to speak out against toxic femininity.

Of course no conviction has been secured, but why should allegedly baby-murdering women be given due process? Why do we give all the rights to these alleged baby murderers, what about the rights of innocent babies? Any woman anonymously accused of murdering babies without a shred of evidence should have her life, reputation and career destroyed and then be thrown into prison on the unsupported word of the accuser.

I think all women need to take responsibility for baby murdering, woman up, and tell other women murdering babies is wrong. I think if women will just tell their friends to stop murdering babies because it is wrong, the problem will be solved.

I believe every women that has ever hit, raised her voice, given a cross look to a child or known of another woman that has done any of those things without confronting her is contributing to baby murdering culture. 

I think any woman who disagrees with anything I’ve said should be shouted down as a femsplianing, baby-murder apologist, and baby-hater.

If you find the above to be sexist, offensive and illogical rubbish, please reflect on the fact that is the mirror image of the dominant narrative directed against men as a group. It is repeated on a daily basis by media, commentators, politicians, academics and celebrities as if it were an established truth. Any man daring to challenge it is attacked as a misogynist.

L. Greg Burton, Cooks Hill

CONVICTION GIVES US BELIEF

IT’S ABOUT time this member of the Catholic Church is being dealt with. It's been a long time coming.

For years he chose to do nothing about what these abused members of the Catholic Church had endured, despite the fact that they entrusted him with this truly awful information, assuming they had gone to someone who would be on their side and act appropriately. How wrong they were. 

He not only apparently sat on this for years, but then protested very loudly his innocence, claiming he had no knowledge. Twelve months’ home detention may be more appropriate in my opinion for someone who has pleaded guilty and shown remorse, but not for Wilson, who has denied these charges and delayed the justice the victims are finally receiving. Congratulations to every person who has played a role in this conviction. 

Patricia Barnes, Elermore Vale

Comments

Discuss "Minister should lay off magistrate criticism"

Please note: All comments made or shown here are bound by the Online Discussion Terms & Conditions.