More and more Australians are turning vegan as we shift our thinking to how our food is sourced and processed

Nutritious: Vegan food offers a nutritious and cruelty free diet that more and more Australians are opting for.
Nutritious: Vegan food offers a nutritious and cruelty free diet that more and more Australians are opting for.

World Vegan month kicked off again on November 1st, celebrating how far the vegan movement has come around the world. Not least in Australia.

According to Roy Morgan Research, there are 2.25 million Australians that choose to live as vegans, making us one of the fastest growing vegan markets behind the United Arab Emirates and China.

Unlike vegetarians vegans chose to avoid eating any produce from animals or animal products including eggs and milk.

With a high number of people choosing to eat ethically sourced, cruelty free foods the vegan diet has grown in popularity with many supermarkets catering for vegans among the stock on their shelves.

Brett Saunders of the Bhakti Tree in Mayfield says that the a high number of younger people in particular unhappy with how food is produced and animals are mistreated, is one of the reasons veganism is continuing to rise.

“I think more and more people are looking at the processes involved in the production of their food today and do not want to support the mistreatment of animals and so we see many more embracing vegan and vegetarian ways of eating.”

I think more and more people are looking at the processes involved in the production of their food today

The Bhakti Tree is part of Hare Krishna Food for Life Hunter Valley Inc. and is a registered charity, committed to helping people from all walks of life to be happy and healthy. The word Bhakti is a sanskrit word meaning love.

The various activities of the Bhakti Tree include pure vegetarian and vegan food at their café in Mayfield or at University of Newcastle through the student vegetarian club, yoga, kirtan (mantra-meditation), philosophy discussions, cooking classes, and catering.

While Bhakti Tree does not exclusively serve vegan food, it only uses animal products that have been produced in the manner of Ahimsa - meaning non-violent. Its farm in Millfield in the Hunter Valley is home to about 90 cows that lead a natural life and importantly, a natural death.

As the cows produce milks for calves, any excess is hand-milked and used for products such as yoghurt, paneers and milk at the restaurant in Mayfield. The restaurant in Mayfield offers a lunchtime and dinner menu. As a not-for-profit the focus is on providing quality food at a low cost. Visit: www.thebhaktitree.org.au

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